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NYU Grossman School of Medicine

Medical School

Mailing Address
550 1st Avenue
New York, New York 10016
Phone
(212) 263-5290
School Information
"Our 29 academic departments include nationally and internationally recognized faculty in clinical and basic sciences. We strive to bring together the best and brightest to cultivate collaboration across disciplines, and to facilitate breakthroughs that address today’s biggest challenges in medicine. We have a long history of excellence, beginning in 1841 when six eminent physician–scientists opened the medical college that would become NYU School of Medicine. In November 2019, the school was renamed NYU Grossman School of Medicine to honor current dean and CEO Robert I. Grossman, MD...We are proud to offer every student enrolled in our MD degree program full-tuition scholarships as part of our tuition-free initiative. We believe providing tuition-free education will lead to better patient care and will benefit society as a whole by turning the best and brightest future physicians into leaders with the potential to transform healthcare." The school has more than 1,300 residents and fellows across 156 medical residency and fellowship training programs. It also has more than 300 graduate students and more than 400 postdoctoral fellows. The school has a 2.4:1 student-faculty ratio. (Source: https://med.nyu.edu/our-community/about-us) (Source: https://www.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-medical-schools/new-york-university-04073#:~:text=The%20faculty%2Dstudent%20ratio%20at,full%2Dtime%20faculty%20on%20staff.)
General Information
NYU Grossman School of Medicine's Office of Diversity Affairs announced that it has "partnered with the Office of Medical Education to convene a Social Determinants of Health Task Force to include content across the undergraduate medical education (UME) curriculum on systemic racism and its impact on health outcomes. We are also partnering with graduate medical education (GME) programs and faculty to develop health equity curriculum for both UME and GME, as well as continuing education opportunities for faculty.” The university's Health Sciences library offers a “Race and racism in medicine” resource guide, which includes Ibram X. Kendi’s “How to Be an Antiracist” and an article from the New York Times’ 1619 Project. See developments below:

Actions Taken

Curriculum Changes and Requirements
  • The school’s Office of Diversity Affairs said, “The Office of Diversity Affairs partnered with the Office of Medical Education to convene a Social Determinants of Health Task Force to include content across the undergraduate medical education (UME) curriculum on systemic racism and its impact on health outcomes. We are also partnering with graduate medical education (GME) programs and faculty to develop health equity curriculum for both UME and GME, as well as continuing education opportunities for faculty.”
Program and Research Funding
  • The school’s Office of Diversity Affairs said, “We are partnering with the Departments of Population Health and Medicine, among others, to advance ground-breaking science that elucidate the causes and help inform strategies to address racial disparities in health.”
  • NYU Langone launched the Institute for Excellence in Health Equity, which “will advance the mission of health equity across our entire healthcare system and strive to build a culture of inclusive excellence by facilitating and enabling recruitment, training, and mentorship of medical students, physicians, and scientists.”
  • NYU Langone’s Section for Health Equity aims to “to promote health equity for racial and ethnic minorities and other underserved populations. We do this by conducting research on the effectiveness of various strategies to reduce health disparities, such as community health worker programs.”
Resources
  • The school’s Office of Diversity Affairs said, “In addition, our office has developed and made available to the entire NYU community a virtual training in implicit bias.”
  • NYU’s Health Sciences library offers a “Race and racism in medicine” resource guide, which includes Ibram X. Kendi’s “How to Be an Antiracist” and an article from the New York Times’ 1619 Project.
  • The Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry’s Anti-Racism Task Force “has developed, implemented, and facilitated anti-racist learning activities across the department and within working groups through a series of facilitated dialogues. The purpose of these activities is to identify and dismantle practices that perpetuate racism. Although there is strength in the organized and conscious action behind these initiatives, equally important is structuring a system of collective accountability to guide this work.”
  • The Office of Science Research has a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion team, which does “forward-looking programming and engagement, attention to opportunities for conversation and growth, a commitment to anti-racism, and crafting and championing policies and procedures that lead to equity.”
  • The Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in Research team will be, “Providing educational resources that keep our community informed on developments within the field of DEI within the biomedical sciences.”
  • The school has a Student Diversity Initiative, which is “a student-driven task force that addresses issues of diversity, inclusion, and cultural competency for medical students at NYU Grossman School of Medicine.”
  • The school has “Diversity in Medical Education” programs, such as the “Practice of Medicine” (“a patient-centered program and continuity of care forum that helps medical students develop culturally competent clinical skills”) and “Health Disparities Selective” (a program where students “learn about health inequities that affect patient care and health outcomes through the health disparities selective, one of the MD degree selective courses. The four-week program uses readings, seminars, specialty clinics, and reflections to teach students about factors that can create health disparities, including race and ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, income, and education”).
  • NYU Langone’s Section for Health Equity provides “education and training for health professionals doing health equity work and help to develop policy that promotes health equity and encourages participatory action.”
  • The school’s Advanced Topics in Bioethics Elective has “Exploring Race and Racism in the History of Medicine” as one possible topic.
Symbolic Actions
  • The Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry “established an Anti-Racism Task Force with the goals of mobilizing to dismantle systemic racism in our department, at our institution, within the disciplines of child and adolescent psychiatry, and in the communities we serve; advocating for social justice; empowering and supporting racially minoritized colleagues and patients; encouraging and supporting white members of our department to explore white privilege and the impacts of systemic racism; and developing and fostering pathways to allyship.”
  • The school received a $20 million award from the American Heart Association to spearhead "a new initiative known as the RESTORE Health Equity Research Network."
  • The school received a $20 million award from the American Heart Association to spearhead "a new initiative known as the RESTORE Health Equity Research Network."
Last updated July 26th, 2022
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