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Stanford University School of Medicine

Medical School

Mailing Address
291 Campus Drive
Stanford, California 94305
Phone
(650) 723-2300
School Information
"A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies. Our close proximity to the resources of the university — including the Schools of Business, Law, Humanities and Sciences, and Engineering, our seamless relationship with our affiliated adult and children’s hospitals, and our ongoing associations with the entrepreneurial endeavors of Silicon Valley, make us uniquely positioned to accelerate the pace at which new knowledge is translated into tangible health benefits." The school enrolls 382 MD candidates, 100 MD/PhD candidates, 844 PhD candidates, and 205 MS candidates. It also employs 2,455 faculty. (Source: https://med.stanford.edu/about.html) (Source: https://med.stanford.edu/school.html)
General Information
In 2017, the Stanford University School of Medicine's “associate dean of minority advising and programs (now emeritus), gathered a group of medical school faculty…to discuss ways in which medical school education could better address issues of anti-racism, social justice and health inequities in the doctor-patient relationship.” The school’s MD program also said, “The Social Justice and Health Equity (SJ&HE) Curriculum Thread was initiated as a CCAP directive during in the Summer of 2020…its committee has been tasked with a comprehensive review of the Stanford Medical School Curriculum to identify strengths and gaps in addressing anti-racist education, health equity and other social justice issues for both our clerkship and pre-clerkship curricula.” The program also “spearheaded the implementation of important reforms to the existing medical school curriculum by working with course directors, faculty, students and staff to revise the existing educational materials. Our expectation is that anti-racist education will be a permanent thread included within the Stanford Medical School Curriculum.” See developments below:

Actions Taken

Curriculum Changes and Requirements
  • In 2017, the “associate dean of minority advising and programs (now emeritus), gathered a group of medical school faculty…to discuss ways in which medical school education could better address issues of anti-racism, social justice and health inequities in the doctor-patient relationship.”
  • The school’s MD program said, “The Social Justice and Health Equity (SJ&HE) Curriculum Thread was initiated as a CCAP directive during in the Summer of 2020…its committee has been tasked with a comprehensive review of the Stanford Medical School Curriculum to identify strengths and gaps in addressing anti-racist education, health equity and other social justice issues for both our clerkship and pre-clerkship curricula.” The program also “spearheaded the implementation of important reforms to the existing medical school curriculum by working with course directors, faculty, students and staff to revise the existing educational materials. Our expectation is that anti-racist education will be a permanent thread included within the Stanford Medical School Curriculum.”
  • One objective of the Social Justice & Health Equity Curriculum Thread is to, “Demonstrate that racism and cultural biases in medicine are institutional, i.e. influenced and created more by societal structures and cultural assumptions than by individual and psychological factors,” by identifying “institutionalized racism as a modifier of health outcomes” and defining/analyzing “the historical legacy of systemic and structural racism in healthcare and medicine.”
Program and Research Funding
  • The Presence 5 for Racial Justice team is pursuing projects that will “address underlying structural racism and inequity to promote healing amidst a history of racism in medicine,” such as “Clinician Communication Practices to Disrupt Racism and Promote Health Equity,” “Transdisciplinary Anti-Racism Communication Strategies: Insights from Diverse Fields,” “Presence 5 for Racial Justice Medical Education Curriculum,” and “Presence 5 for Racial Justice Action Lab: Translating research into practice to promote health equity and racial justice in health care” (supported by a grant from Stanford's Center for Comparative Race and Ethnicity).
Resources
  • The school has “Black Lives Matter” Resources, which include a “Confronting white supremacy: Educational Resource Sheet” and “Anti-racism resources for white people.”
  • The Teaching and Mentoring Academy has “Resources for Anti-Racist Education and Action,” which reference Ibram X. Kendi’s “How to Be an Antiracist.”
  • The school has an “Antiracism Book Club,” which is a “media-based discussion group geared toward Stanford Health affiliates, students, staff, and faculty. The group meets once a month to explore issues relevant to racism in medicine through the written word and videos.”
  • The Department of Pediatrics’ Office of Child Health Equity offers an “Anti-Racism & Health Resources” guide, which includes Ibram X. Kendi’s “How to Be and Antiracist” and Robin DiAngelo’s “White Fragility.”
  • The Office of Faculty Development and Diversity offers “BLM Resources for Faculty,” which are “curated by the Anti-Racism Coalition, or ARC.” The resources include the “AAMC Anti-racism in Medicine Collection,” which “provides educators with practice-based, peer-reviewed resources to teach anti-racist knowledge and clinical skills, elevates the educational scholarship of anti-racist curricula, and aims to convene a community of collaborators dedicated to the elimination of racism within medical education.”
  • The Medical Student Association offers “Black Lives Matter Resources,” which include Ibram X. Kendi’s article in the Atlantic (titled “The American Nightmare”) and the 1619 podcast.
  • The Department of Medicine offers Diversity Resources, which include funding opportunities, such as the Chair Diversity Investigator Awards (which support “research that addresses health inequity, social determinants of health, cultural competence, outcomes improvement, health system access/utilization for racial, ethnic, and sexual and gender minorities, among many other possibilities.”) and the Dr. Fernando Mendoza HERO (Health Equity Research and Opportunity) Award.
  • The Department of Pediatrics has a Stanford Pediatrics Advancing Anti-Racism Coalition (SPAARC), which aims to “promote a culture of anti-racism in the Stanford Department of Pediatrics through immediate action, development of nimble systems, and longitudinal commitment to ongoing work, engagement and progress towards equity.” The SPAARC website links to other resource pages.
  • The Office of Faculty Development and Diversity launched a Health Equity Action Leadership (HEAL) Network, which “will bring faculty together to determine how we can better address health inequities.”
  • The HEAL Network site has linked to the “Precision Health Equity in Primary Care Seminar Series,” which presents, “the state of the science of precision health equity, from societal, scientific, and clinical perspectives, and was designed to inform and inspire primary care providers to translate these innovations into their practices and communities.” One session is “SPHERE Seminar I: Precision Health Equity and Social Justice.”
  • The Department of Pediatrics offers Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion resources, such as “Anti-Racism Educational Resources” and a “Racial Equity Tools Glossary.”
  • The Department of Urology offers Diversity, Equity and Inclusion resources.
  • Stanford Medicine held “Inclusive Leadership Workshops conducted in which over 500 leaders worked to advance their commitment to inclusion, diversity, and belonging.”
  • Stanford Medicine “developed anti-racism conversation guides for supervisors to use at management meetings, new leadership orientations, and on ‘Viz Wall’ posting. Topics include the meaning of Saying Black Lives Matter and Stop Asian Hate.”
  • The school announced, “New Department of Health Policy launched in September with billets focused on structural racism, social determinants of health, and health policy.”
  • The school announced, “Faculty DEI training piloted at Stanford University with over 30 SoM faculty participants.”
  • The school announced that the “SoM launched planning for new educational initiatives aimed at developing future health equity leaders” and that “Stanford Medicine will launch national health equity dialogue series in Winter Quarter.”
Symbolic Actions
  • 800 Stanford Medicine community members gathered on campus to call for “action against racial injustice, inequities.”
  • The Department of Immunology has a CDIII (Community, Diversity and Inclusion In Immunology) committee “that aims to promote a culture of diversity, equity and inclusion in the Immunology Program through the identification and recommendation of long-lasting creative solutions that embrace anti-racism principles and eliminate systemic bias.”
  • The Department of Medicine’s Diversity and Inclusion page lists a “Faculty Committee” and “Staff Committee.”
  • The school tweeted, "Writers from @StanfordMedMuse spoke about the way their status as medical professionals protects them from anti-Black racism and the hope they feel from the world’s reaction to the death of George Floyd."
  • The school tweeted, "We renew our pledge to confront all forms of racism and inequity, and will continue working toward a future free of hate."
  • The school tweeted, "More than 800 members of the Stanford Medicine community gathered this week to add their voices to a nationwide outcry against racism and to affirm that Black Lives Matter."
  • The school tweeted, "Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine’s values. Read our leaders' pledge on racial equity."
  • The school posted on its Facebook page, "More than 800 members of the Stanford Medicine community gathered this week to add their voices to a nationwide outcry against racism and to affirm that Black Lives Matter. stan.md/3dJjeos #WhiteCoatsForBlackLives."
  • The school posted on its Facebook page, "Over the next several days, we’ll be sharing stories from Stanford Medicine Magazine’s latest issue, which focuses on racial inequity in medicine. Today we highlight some new health care strategies and approaches to reach marginalized communities."
  • The school posted on its Facebook page, "The new issue of Stanford Medicine Magazine examines racial inequity and inequality in medicine and explores initiatives to close the gaps in care."
  • The school posted on its Facebook page, "On the anniversary of George Floyd’s murder, Stanford Medicine’s leaders reinforced this message to our community. "On this difficult anniversary, our heartfelt condolences go out to George Floyd's family -- and to everyone who has lost someone they love due to racism and racial violence. "At Stanford Medicine, through daily actions that advance justice and equity, we are committed to honoring the memory of Mr. Floyd and countless others who have endured racial prejudice. "We renew our pledge to confront all forms of racism and inequity, and will continue working toward a future free of hate."
  • The school posted on its Facebook page, "The latest issue of Stanford Medicine magazine focuses on countering the impact of racism on health."
  • The school posted on its Facebook page, "'Racial inequity is a public health crisis that’s never been solved.' -- Lloyd Minor MD, dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine."
  • The school posted on its Facebook page, "In efforts to address racial inequity and medical mistrust, Stanford researchers and clinicians are redesigning health care strategies and implementing new approaches to reach marginalized communities."
  • The school posted on its Facebook page, "The newest issue of Stanford Medicine magazine features articles about the health repercussions of racial inequity and ways to address them."
  • The school posted on its Instagram page, "This message from Stanford Medicine’s three leaders is a simple one - but the words are more important now than ever. At a Town Hall yesterday afternoon, our dean and two CEOs offered a place for our entire community to grieve together over the recent senseless killings and to discuss how to combat racial injustice once and for all. There’s much work to be done and we don’t have all the answers, our leaders said, but Stanford Medicine is committed to accelerating change."
  • The school posted on its Instagram, "More than 800 members of the Stanford Medicine community gathered on campus yesterday afternoon to add their voices to a nationwide outcry against racism and to affirm that Black Lives Matter."
  • The school posted on its Instagram, "In a year marred by a pandemic, racial injustice, divisive partisanship, and environmental disasters, we could not be prouder of how our Stanford Medicine community responded. Each day, your courage, resilience and empathy breathe life into Stanford Medicine’s mission and make the impossible possible."
  • The school posted on its Instagram, "What does race have to do with health? And what can the health care system do about racism? "Over the next several days, we’ll be sharing stories from Stanford Medicine magazine’s latest issue — Closing the Gap — which examines racial inequity and inequality in medicine, and how researchers at #StanfordMedicine are working to develop solutions."
  • The school posted on its Instagram, "Stanford Medicine researchers and clinicians are leading efforts to identify how racism affects childbirth, translate science into safer care during pregnancy for women of color, and foster open dialogue between these women and their doctors."
  • The school posted a message to Instagram, where it reaffirmed its pledge "to confront all forms of racism and inequity."
Last updated December 2nd, 2022
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