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The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Medical School

Mailing Address
733 N Broadway
Baltimore, Maryland 21205
Phone
(410) 955-5000
Email address
somadmiss@jhmi.edu
School Information
"Johns Hopkins Medicine, headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland, is a $9.7 billion integrated global health enterprise and one of the leading health care systems in the United States... Johns Hopkins Medicine, a nonprofit, combines over 125 years of commitment to community care with groundbreaking research, teaching and medical services to patients worldwide." The school enrolls over over 1,380 medical and doctoral students, and employs over 3,200 full-time faculty members. (Source: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/about/_downloads/JHM-Fast-Facts.pdf)
General Information
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will be spearheading the “Development of an anti-oppression/antiracism curriculum,” which will include topics such as “History and Anti-Racism: Then and Now,” “Intersectionality and Dialogue”, and “Systemic Inequality.” The school also announced that “all faculty, students, trainees, postdocs and fellows will be required to complete a virtual training session in unconscious bias. It will be followed by anti-racism and then bystander intervention training.” The school is further requiring “One-hour live, virtual unconscious bias training” for “managers and above; hospital nurse leaders; credentialed providers (such as physician assistants and nurse practitioners); and for school of medicine faculty and trainees (including residents, fellows, medical and graduate students, and research postdocs), as well as those at a manager level or above.”

Actions Taken

Anti-Racism, Bias, and Diversity Training
  • The School of Medicine announced that “all faculty, students, trainees, postdocs and fellows will be required to complete a virtual training session in unconscious bias. It will be followed by anti-racism and then bystander intervention training.”
Curriculum Changes and Requirements
  • The school will be spearheading the “Development of an anti-oppression/antiracism curriculum,” which will include topics such as “History and Anti-Racism: Then and Now,” “Intersectionality and Dialogue”, and “Systemic Inequality.”
Faculty/Staff Requirements
  • The school is requiring “One-hour live, virtual unconscious bias training” for “managers and above; hospital nurse leaders; credentialed providers (such as physician assistants and nurse practitioners); and for school of medicine faculty and trainees (including residents, fellows, medical and graduate students, and research postdocs), as well as those at a manager level or above.”
Program and Research Funding
  • The Office of Diversity, Inclusion and Health Equity “has developed an infrastructure to identify and outline the operational needs to promote and address health equity across Johns Hopkins Health System. We have assembled a team with expertise in health equity research, data analysis, and implementation.”
Resources
  • The school is offering “Diversity, Inclusion and Health Equity Resources,” such as “One-hour live, virtual unconscious bias training” and “Launch of Journeys in Healing Town Hall Series” (which will be “open to the entire Johns Hopkins Medicine community and will focus on structural racism).
  • The school also recommended “How to Be an Antiracist” by Ibram X. Kendi, “with accompanying discussion guide and videos: ‘The difference between being ‘not racist’ and antiracist | Ibram X. Kendi’ and ‘Ibram X. Kendi on How to Be an Antiracist at UC Berkeley.’”
  • The Department of the History of Medicine hosted a conference on “Reckoning with Race and Racism in Academic Medicine,” to “confront the legacies of white supremacy and exclusion in American academic medicine and the central role that academic medicine has played and continues to play in the perpetuation of false biological concepts of race.”
  • The Department of Cell Biology links to “Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Resources” from the School of Medicine.
  • In their letter, Biomedical Engineering’s leadership recommend several anti-racism resources, such as “The Possessive Investment in Whiteness: Racialized Social Democracy and the ‘White’ Problem in American Studies” and Ibram X. Kendi’s “An Antiracist Reading List.”
  • The school has an Office of Diversity, Inclusion and Health Equity.
  • The Office of Diversity, Inclusion and Health Equity offers “Online Education and Trainings” on “Unconscious Bias Awareness,” “Mitigating Unconscious Bias,” and “JHHC | Cultural Sensitivity.”
  • The Office of Diversity, Inclusion and Health Equity offers an “Unconscious Bias and Diversity Awareness Facilitator Train the Trainer Program,” which will “deliver unconscious bias and diversity awareness trainings to the colleagues at their entities.”
  • The Office of Diversity, Inclusion and Health Equity offers “Racial Discussion Resources,” including a “Guidelines for Facilitating Racial Dialogues Webinar” and “White Parents: Here's How To (and How Not To) Talk to Your Kids About Racism.”
Symbolic Actions
  • The school has an “Office of Medical Student Diversity.”
  • The school tweeted, "Entrenched inequality has led to dramatically poorer health outcomes for people of color and roadblocks to advancement for underrepresented physicians. What steps must we take to end racism in health care? Our experts weigh in." In the same tweet, the school linked to a page titled "Black Lives Matter in Medicine: What Must Change?"
  • The school tweeted, "To demonstrate solidarity against racism, inequity and oppression, Johns Hopkins residents along with the larger Hopkins community joined the #WhiteCoatsforBlackLives today to honor George Floyd and the other victims who have been killed as a result of police brutality."
  • On its Twitter, the school spotlighted a group, which "bases their spontaneous theater pieces on #community stories shared by the audience. Their work has addressed #equity, #inclusion and health concerns among D.C.’s underserved residents."
  • The school posted on Facebook, "Johns Hopkins has about 4,000 medical and graduate students, residents, clinical fellows and postdoctoral research fellows. For each of them, COVID-19 and a renewed focus on racial injustice and disparities is creating an academic year for the history books, one with challenges galore but opportunities as well."
  • The school posted on Facebook, "People of color may have special concerns about the safety and effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine due to historic health inequities and other causes of vaccine hesitancy. A leading expert in diversity in medicine answers questions and provides information about COVID-19 vaccinations, their safety, and what Black, Hispanic/Latinx and Native American people should know."
  • The school posted on Facebook, "People of color are vulnerable to severe cases of COVID-19 due to long-standing health inequities and occupational risk."
  • The school posted on Facebook, "The protests that erupted across the nation in the wake of George Floyd’s death have served as a catalyst for recognizing and dismantling systemic racism. In health care, entrenched inequality has led to dramatically poorer health outcomes for people of color and roadblocks to advancement for underrepresented physicians."
  • The school posted on Facebook, "These last several months have posed a tremendous burden for many to bear, starting with the pandemic and more recently the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery. These events have left us with heavy hearts and sadly reinforce the brutal truth that the African American community remains vulnerable to racism and senseless violence, even during a pandemic. "We hear the needs of the Johns Hopkins community to have an honest dialogue about these issues and develop steps to address these issues through our daily activities and relationships, scholarship and teaching, and health care delivery and leadership. We must acknowledge that these vulnerabilities to violence and health crises faced by black and brown communities are born out of continued racial disparities in education, employment, housing and criminal justice. "During this time of immense challenge, let us work together to be a light to facilitate education, healing, connection, support and service to each other and to our community. We stand here with you."
  • The school posted on its Instagram, "These last several months have posed a tremendous burden for many to bear, starting with the pandemic and more recently the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery. These events have left us with heavy hearts and sadly reinforce the brutal truth that the African American community remains vulnerable to racism and senseless violence, even during a pandemic. "We hear the needs of the Johns Hopkins community to have an honest dialogue about these issues and develop steps to address these issues through our daily activities and relationships, scholarship and teaching, and health care delivery and leadership. We must acknowledge that these vulnerabilities to violence and health crises faced by black and brown communities are born out of continued racial disparities in education, employment, housing and criminal justice. "During this time of immense challenge, let us work together to be a light to facilitate education, healing, connection, support and service to each other and to our community. We stand here with you."
  • The school posted on Instagram, "To demonstrate solidarity against racism, inequity and oppression, Johns Hopkins residents along with the larger Hopkins community joined the #WhiteCoatsforBlackLives today to honor George Floyd and the other victims who have been killed as a result of police brutality. #HopkinsWC4BL #WCFBL"
Last updated July 26th, 2022
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