Critical Race Training in Education

Barnard College of Columbia University

Undergraduate

Mailing Address
3009 Broadway St
New York, New York 10027
Phone
(212) 854-5262
School Information
Founded in 1889, Barnard was the only college in New York City, and one of the few in the nation, where women could receive the same rigorous and challenging education available to men. The College was named after educator, mathematician, and 10th president of Columbia College Frederick A.P. Barnard, who argued unsuccessfully for the admission of women to Columbia University. The school’s founding, however, was largely due to the rallying efforts of Annie Nathan Meyer, a student and writer who was equally dissatisfied with Columbia’s stance and staunchly committed to the education of women. She joined forces with a small group of her peers to petition the University Trustees for an affiliated self-sustaining liberal arts women’s college, and in two years accomplished what she had set out to do.
General Information
The college has made a broad range of institutional commitments to the work of DEI for several generations. Keeping track of how Barnard progresses on institutional DEI commitments matters. DEI work at Barnard seeks to steward and track the commitments we make toward change and ensure the community is regularly informed about how we are progressing toward the ongoing goals that we set. Barnard’s mission is to rigorously educate and empower women, providing them with the ability to think, discern, and move effectively in the world—a world that is different from when the College was founded. Now more than ever, the success of that mission depends on a community made up of diverse perspectives born from different lived experiences. DEI works in partnership with faculty, staff and students in offices and programs across the college in an effort to increase awareness and deepen commitment to diversity and inclusion across the institution. Barnard College and Columbia University are located in Lenapehoking, the traditional territory of the Lenape people and a place of longstanding importance to Native peoples from the region and around the world. We give honor to the Indigenous people of this place--past, present and future--and recognize their displacement, dispossession and continued presence. (source: https://barnard.edu/diversity-equity-inclusion)

Critical Race Training Activity

  • Program and Research Funding

    Ariana González Stokas joined Barnard College in July 2019 as inaugural Vice President of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion. She has a B.A. in philosophy and studio arts from Bard College. She earned her Ph.D. in philosophy and education from Teachers College, Columbia University. Her doctoral research examined the intersections of aesthetics, education, and inequality. Her current research investigates reparative epistemologies in universities and the role of social movement pedagogy from Latin America and the Caribbean in “inventing school.” She is a co-investigator on the Mellon subgrant Critical Theory in the Global South and was the project director for a Lumina Rockefeller grant at Bard to cultivate racial equity through revealing suppressed local histories. Prior to Barnard, González Stokas served as the inaugural Dean of Inclusive Excellence at Bard College in New York. While there she was instrumental in identifying working groups to establish a clear and strategic vision for Pell-eligible and DACA students. She also supported the development and institutionalization of student-initiated projects, symbolic reparation projects such as signage to commemorate suppressed histories, and created, along with a team of faculty, staff, and students, Gilson Place for interracial and intercultural dialogue. Prior to her role at Bard, she was an assistant professor of interdisciplinary studies at Guttman Community College of the City University of New York (CUNY), where she was a founding faculty member. González Stokas brings a wealth of experience to Barnard as a committed educator and researcher. She has worked as an administrator, faculty member, and scholar of philosophy and education, with a proven track record of being dedicated to equity and access.

  • Curriculum Changes and Requirements

    Barnard provides students extensive opportunities in extracurricular social justice education, including the Social Justice Resource Room, the Social Justice residential hall, Equity in Action workshops, and others.

  • Curriculum Changes and Requirements

    Incoming freshmen are required to complete Barnard BLUE: The Barnard BLUE Series includes workshops, dialogues, and a summit around leadership development and social justice education. This series is aimed to engage students in intentional dialogues to explore their identities and what it means to foster inclusive communities. All incoming students are required to attend the Discover Barnard BLUE session during NSOP as an introduction to the series and to begin the conversation about what equitable and inclusive communities mean. Our Collective, workshops, and summit exist to further that conversation during a students times at Barnard. Discover Barnard BLUE The Barnard BLUE Series includes workshops, dialogues, and a summit around leadership development and social justice education. This series is aimed to engage students in intentional dialogues to explore their identities and what it means to foster inclusive communities. All incoming students are required to attend the Discover Barnard BLUE session during NSOP as an introduction to the series and to begin the conversation about what equitable and inclusive communities mean. Our Collective, workshops, and summit exist to further that conversation during a students times at Barnard. Every incoming student is required to attend this session during the New Student Orientation Program. Discover Barnard BLUE (DBB) replaced what was "Perspectives on Diversity" and serves as an interactive session to assist students in defining what is an equitable and inclusive community, and what there are hopes are for their time at Barnard. We specifically explore the many identities that all students bring to campus and discuss how these identities impact how we all uniquely contribute to and intersect with the larger Barnard community. Discover Barnard BLUE is facilitated by Student Life staff and NSOP Orientation Leaders.

  • Anti-Racism, Bias, and Diversity Training

    Pursuant to a 2017 Diversity Task Force report, Barnard has created a vast network of goals, including 2020-2021 Commitments such as becoming a member of the Liberal Arts College Racial Justice Equity Leadership Alliance, hiring an Executive Director for Community Engagement and Inclusion, Learning from Institutional History, and the like. There is much more detail available on the website.

  • Re-Imagining Policing

    Barnard has restructured its campus safety force: "The safety and well-being of our students, faculty, staff, and guests are of the utmost importance to Barnard. CARES represents a conceptual and organizational evolution at Barnard in order to promote community safety and well-being. The new structure includes Community Safety, focused on campus security concerns while incorporating new approaches to practice, breaks out a first response team, sensitive to the individual challenges and crises faced on a college campus, and enfolds the Nondiscrimination and Title IX office, ensuring equity and collaborating across these areas of expertise."

  • Curriculum Changes and Requirements

    Critical Inquiry Labs allow students to explore various subjects surrounding Critical Theory, including CRT.

  • Symbolic Actions

    The spring lecture series in 2021 included: "The Invention of Race in the European Middle Ages." Prof. Heng's lecture is sponsored by the Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies (CCIS) and Department of Women's Studies, Barnard College.

  • Resources

    A joint effort by Africana Studies, American Studies and Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies, the Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies (CCIS) is dedicated to creating a vibrant intellectual community across disciplinary boundaries and fostering the in-depth study of race and ethnicity at Barnard College. CCIS offers students and faculty the intellectual space to develop transformative frameworks for thinking through issues of ethnicity and race in both local and global contexts.

  • Political Actions and Support for Anti-Racism

    Community Impact serves individuals in need in the communities of Upper Manhattan while providing meaningful volunteering and leadership opportunities for students at Columbia University and Barnard College.

Last updated May 20th, 2021