Critical Race Training in Education

University of Chicago

Undergraduate

Mailing Address
5801 S Ellis Ave
Chicago, Illinois 60637
Phone
(773) 702-1234
School Information
"The University of Chicago is an urban research university that has driven new ways of thinking since 1890. Our commitment to free and open inquiry draws inspired scholars to our global campuses, where ideas are born that challenge and change the world. We empower individuals to challenge conventional thinking in pursuit of original ideas. Students in the College develop critical, analytic, and writing skills in our rigorous, interdisciplinary core curriculum. Through graduate programs, students test their ideas with UChicago scholars, and become the next generation of leaders in academia, industry, nonprofits, and government." The university enrolls over 16,900 students, has over 2,300 faculty, and offers 52 majors and 41 minors across its five divisions and six professional schools. (Source: https://www.uchicago.edu/about/)
General Information
The University of Chicago has taken steps to implement anti-racist program requirements, although whether these requirements are mandatory training or additional requirements for existing university programs is unclear. Additionally, the university promised to make additions to its curricula, but not specific changes have been announced. The University of Chicago is also considering the creation and funding of a "Department of Critical Race Studies". No mandatory Critical Race Training sessions are yet required of students. However, see developments below:

Critical Race Training Activity

  • Curriculum Changes and Requirements

    Anti-Racism program requirements, additions to curricula.

  • Program and Research Funding

    The University of Chicago is considering the creation and funding of a "Department of Critical Race Studies".

  • Resources

    "The BA program in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies (CRES) offers an interdisciplinary curriculum that leads students to examine both the processes through which members of the human population have been constructed as racial and ethnic groups, and the political, historical, social, and cultural effects of this constitution. It trains students to think critically and comparatively about the varying ways in which race and ethnicity have been constructed in different parts of the world and in different historical periods. Focusing on conquest, subjugation, genocide, slavery, segregation, migration, and diasporas, among other related topics, CRES prompts students to examine the political, social, and cultural practices and institutions of minority or marginalized populations in colonial and postcolonial settings."

Last updated April 26th, 2021